Social Topics

Using Your Talents And Skills For Others

I recently helped my sister move some furniture out of her apartment and it got me thinking about how we use our talents. Granted, carrying heavy and awkward things around may not require much talent. Yet, nonetheless, it got me thinking about it. What would be the benefit to our society if we all used our talents more for others than for ourselves?

There is no denying that virtually all talents have a purpose or direct way of benefitting others. Someone who knits can make hats, mittens, and scarves for the homeless or poor. Carpentry skills can be used to help a neighbor build a shed. If a person has talent playing a piano, they can teach others so that even more people can share in the joy it brings. A person who knows how to work on cars can fix a vehicle for a friend. The list could go on and on.

If we all looked for opportunities to use our various skills to help the people around us, it could save people money. There are many demands on our finances these days, more than ever before. Even having someone help us with a lesser expense can be a welcome break for our wallets. It could be as simple as baking dinner for a neighbor or raking the yard of an elderly person.

Sharing our talents and skills can also help alleviate the stress that others feel. Having a leaky roof or clunking vehicle can be nerve wracking. It can be a big relief when someone steps up to help you out of a situation like that. It makes what seems like a daunting task much more manageable, especially if you didn’t know how to fix the issue yourself or couldn’t pay to have it fixed.

Taking advantage of chances to help others with your skills and talents can also help to build new relationships as well as make current ones stronger. I think few people would argue with me when I say that working side-by-side is a great way to get to know someone. We seem to let our guard down a bit when we are working, thus giving others a better view of who we really are. Giving another person something you made for them is also a great way to break the ice and potentially become a big part of someone else’s life.

Another benefit to using your talents and skills to help others is that you can help other people develop the same talents and skills. There is great reward both in learning from one another, and teaching one another. Both can be empowering in their own ways. Teaching can help give purpose to your life while learning helps empower you to solve problems and also help others.

What I believe to be the most important aspect of sharing one’s skills and talents with others is the love it shows. Offering your talents or skills to another person is demanding of our time and effort. We wouldn’t give that much of ourselves unless we felt a fondness for the people in our lives. The people around you will see that and feel valued by you. This can easily have a ripple effect throughout the lives of many as each person who is helped seeks an opportunity to help another.

There you have it, some ways that sharing your skills and talents can have a positive affect in the lives of others. I think the idea of helping others is very important, as well as something that I personally need to improve on. It oftentimes doesn’t require a great deal of skill, talent, or knowledge. Typically all that is needed is more skill, talent, or knowledge (in the relevant area) than the person you are helping. This list is by no means comprehensive and I hope that if you have something to add to my list, you take the opportunity to do so by leaving a comment.

2 Comments

  • Dianne

    I think you have to be somewhat confident in your skill/talent in order to offer to help someone or to make something for someone. You also have to be secure enough emotionally because your offer I’d help may be rejected, or the hat you have made may never be worn, or the job you have done for someone might be criticized.

    • Junior

      True, I had not considered those obstacles or disappointments. It certainly takes some courage to put yourself out there, but I think it is usually beneficial in the end. Now watch my words come back to haunt me the next time someone asks me to make something outside of my comfort zone!

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